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COURSES OFFERED

Anthropology 1
Introduction to Physical Anthropology

3 units; 3 hours lecture
Recommended Preparation: eligibility for English 1A
Credit, degree applicable
Transfer CSU, UC

This course explores and emphasizes the evolution and biological diversity of the human species and our closest living relative, the non-human primates. Topics include genetics, mechanisms of evolutionary change, human variation, and the reconstruction of human evolutionary history through examination of the fossil record.

 

Anthropology 2
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

3 units; 3 hours lecture
Recommended Preparation:  eligibility for English 1A
Credit, degree applicable
Transfer CSU, UC

This course will provide students with an introduction to culture theory as well as to the cross-cultural understanding of human behavior. Emphasis will be placed on subsistence strategies, marriage and kinship institutions; levels of sociopolitical, organization; and religious systems along; with the effects of cultural change, mainly as the result of European expansion, industrialization, and globalization.

 

Anthropology 3
Introduction to Archaeology

3 units; 3 hours lecture
Recommended Preparation: eligibility for English 1A
Credit, degree applicable
Transfer CSU, UC

This course is a survey of the field of archaeology in the United States and abroad. It traces the history of archaeology and reviews the concepts, topics of concern, and research methodologies commonly encountered within the field of archaeology. Students will be introduced to basic techniques of soils analysis and archaeological materials analysis.

 

Anthropology 4
Language and Culture

3 units; 3 hours lecture
Recommended Preparation: eligibility for English 1A
Credit, degree applicable
Transfer CSU, UC

This course introduces students to the anthropological study of language. Using a cross-cultural perspective, students will examine the relationship between culture and the ways in which humans communicate. Topics include language acquisition, structure, diversity, and change. The social and non-verbal aspects of language will also be explored.

 

Anthropology 5

Physical Anthropology Laboratory

1 unit; 3 hours lab
Prerequisite: Anthropology 1 with a minimum grade of C or concurrent enrollment
Credit, degree applicable
Transfer CSU, UC

This course uses laboratory exercises and hands-on activities to explore the primary topics of physical anthropology. Topics will include principles of evolution, human genetics, forensic anthropology, behavior and anatomy of nonhuman primates, human variation, and fossil evidence for human evolution.

 

Anthropology 6
Native Peoples of North America

3 units; 3 hours lecture
Recommended Preparation: eligibility for English 1A
Credit, degree applicable
Transfer CSU, UC

This course is designed to provide an understanding  of the origins, culture areas, and culture characteristics of native peoples north of Mexico. Topics include the prehistory of these aboriginal New World populations, cultural adaptations to various environments, and interactions with non-natives during and following the period of European expansion.

 

Anthropology 7
Native Peoples of South America

3 units; 3 hours lecture
Recommended Preparation: eligibility for English 1A
Credit, degree applicable
Transfer CSU, UC

This course focuses on the study of the native peoples of South America. Special emphasis is placed on the understanding of the relationship between the environmental zones of South America and the social, economic, political, and religious institutions of indigenous societies. The current conditions of South American indigenous groups, most often as the result of colonialist policies which include globalization and modernization, are also examined.

 

Anthropology 8
Ancient Civilizations of the Mesoamerica

3 units; 3 hours lecture
Recommended Preparation: eligibility for English 1A
Credit, degree applicable
Transfer CSU, UC

This course traces the development of the indigenous societies of this region from the entry of humans into  the Americas at the end of the Upper Paleolithic until the invasion of the Spaniards in the early sixteenth century. Special attention will be given to those societies that achieved chiefdom or state-level political complexity. Topics will include the languages, writing systems, belief systems, political systems, economies, monuments and art of these peoples.

 

Anthropology 9
Women, Culture, and Society

3 units; 3 hours lecture
Recommended Preparation: eligibility for English 1A
Credit, degree applicable
Transfer CSU, UC

This course is a cross-cultural survey of women’s experiences in various types of societies including band, tribal, chiefdom and state level societies. Topics will include women’s roles in subsistence strategies, economics, kinship, marriage and the family, political organization, religion and expressive culture, as well as the cross-cultural social dynamics between men and women. The changing status of women in diverse cultures, the impact of biology and culture on sex roles, and alternate gender categories found in traditional societies will also be examined.

 

Anthropology 11
Anthropology of Magic, Religion, and Witchcraft

3 units; 3 hours lecture
Recommended Preparation: eligibility for English 1A
Credit, degree applicable
Transfer CSU, UC

This course is a cross-cultural and evolutionary survey  of the supernatural. It includes an examination of magic and witchcraft practices and the different functions they play in various world societies including hunting and gathering groups, and tribal level and state level societies. Religious beliefs, symbolism and ritual are explained from an anthropological perspective.

 

Anthropology 12
Ancient Civilizations of the World

3 units; 3 hours lecture
Recommended Preparation: eligibility for English 1A
Credit, degree applicable
Transfer CSU, UC

This course traces the emergence of early states and ancient empires around the globe. The cultural achievements linked to state development are traced through a survey of evidence from both the archaeological and historical records. Students will be introduced to anthropological theories that seek to model and explain the appearance of state-level societies and empires.

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 Last Published 10/12/15