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COURSES OFFERED

 

Philosophy 101

(formerlPhilosoph2)

 Introduction tPhilosoph

3 units; 3 hours lecture

RecommendePreparationeligibility foEnglis1A 

Credit,degree applicable

Transfer CSUUC

This course introduces philosophical ideas and methods concerning knowledge, reality and values. Expected topics will include the sources and limits of knowledge, and the nature of reality. Other topics that may be examined from a philosophical perspective include the nature of the self, religion, science, language, beauty and art, political theory, or mind.

 

Philosophy103

(formerly Philosophy 3)

Ethicand Society

3 units; 3 hours lecture

RecommendePreparationeligibility foEnglis1A 

Credit,degree applicable

Transfer CSU,UC

This course offers a critical study of the ethical theories and their application to problems of modern society. Ethical issues in government and law, social institutions, the arts, and international relations will be emphasized.

 

Philosophy 105

(formerly Philosophy 5)

Critical Thinking and Discourse

3 units; 3 hours lecture

PrerequisiteEnglish1A wita minimum grade of C 

Creditdegree applicable

Transfer CSUUC

This course focuses on the study and development of critical reasoning and effective argumentation. Emphasis is placed on the application of critical thinking skills to the production of clear, well-argued position and advocacy papers and to the linguistic and logical analysis of the writings of others.

 

Philosophy 106

(formerly Philosophy 8)

Introduction tSymbolic Logic

3 units; 3 hours lecture

RecommendePreparationeligibility foEnglis1A

Credit,degree applicable

Transfer CSUUC

This course focuses on the representation of arguments for formal analysis, and the skills and techniques needed to do so effectively. The focus will be on the basic elements of classical and propositional logic with a brief introduction to predicate logic. Also discussed will be informal fallacies, inductive logic, and language.

 

Philosophy 107

(formerly Philosophy 7)

PhilosophoReligion

3 units; 3 hours lecture

RecommendePreparationeligibility foEnglis1A

Credit,degree applicable

Transfer CSUUC

This course is an introduction to traditional philosophical problems connected with religious belief. Issues to be discussed are the existence and nature of God; the problems of evil; the nature of religious language; the existence of miracles; religious experience; and mysticism. The rationality of religious belief will also be examined.

 

Philosophy 111

(formerly Philosophy 10)

History of Ancient and Medieval Philosophy

3 units; 3 hours lecture

RecommendePreparationeligibility foEnglis1A 

Creditdegree applicable

Transfer CSUUC

This course offers a chronological examination of Western philosophical thought developed between 600 B.C.E. and 1300 C.E., including the principle ancient and medieval philosophies of this time period. Topics include Greek and Roman thought, and the rise and development of Christianity.

 

Philosophy112

History of ModerPhilosophy

3 units; 3 hours lecture

RecommendePreparationeligibility foEnglis1A 

Creditdegree applicable

Transfer CSU

This course addresses 16th through 18th century Western philosophy with an emphasis on broad epistemological and metaphysical developments in philosophical thought from Descartes to Kant, and may include some precursors and successors. Some of the concepts explored include empiricism, rationalism, idealism, the limits of knowledge, skepticism, the nature of reality, and arguments for and against the existence of God.

 

Philosophy  113

Contemporary Philosophy

3 units; 3 hours lecture

RecommendePreparationeligibility foEnglis1A 

Creditdegree applicable

TransferCSU

This course addresses the main themes and ideas of 19th and 20th century philosophy. In addition to major contributions in the philosophy of language and ethics, some of the major philosophical movements covered include existentialism, phenomenology, analytic philosophy and logical positivism, pragmaticism, plus post-modernism and post-structuralism.

 

Philosophy 114

(formerly Philosophy 14)

Asian Philosophy

3 units; 3 hours lecture

RecommendePreparationeligibility foEnglis1A

Creditdegree applicable

TransferCSU,UC

This course examines the central concerns, historic contexts and foundational themes of the diverse philosophical traditions of South and East Asia, including Confucianism, Taoism, Hinduism, Buddhism and Shintoism. Although some attention is given to Western ideas to which Asian thinkers have responded, the main emphasis is given to the different kinds of questions that have engaged Asian thinkers.

 

Philosophy 115

(formerly Philosophy 12)

Existentialism

3 units; 3 hours lecture

RecommendePreparationeligibility foEnglis1A 

Creditdegree applicable

TransferCSU,UC

This course will examine the philosophical thought of the two strands of existentialist writers: the religious existentialists such as Kierkegaard, Dostoevsky, and Heidegger, and the atheistic existentialists such as Nietzsche, Camus, and Sartre. Issues that will be examined include authenticity, free will, responsibility for one’s character and actions, the essence, possibilities and limits of human beings, and the meaning of life.

 

Philosophy 117

(formerly Philosophy 17)

Political Philosophy

3 units; 3 hours lecture

RecommendePreparationeligibility frEnglis1A 

Creditdegree applicable

Transfer CSU

In this course students will examine political theory as presented in the primary works of major Western thinkers from Plato to Marx. Fundamental issues to be explored include human nature, justice, power, the role of the state, and the legitimate scope of government.

Note: Philosophy 117 is the same course as Political Scienc7.

 

Philosophy 120

(formerly Philosophy 23)

Ethics, Laand Society 

3 units; 3 hours lecture

RecommendePreparationeligibility foEnglis1A 

Creditdegree applicable

Transfer CSUUC

In this course, the relationship between the various facets of moral and legal thinking is analyzed. Philosophical issues such as justification for the legal enforcement of morality, the legitimacy of an international system of law, the relationship between new technologies and the role of law are examined. The concepts of individual and international rights and obligations will be discussed.

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 Last Published 8/4/15