Current Exhibition
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  MAP MYECC CANVAS APPLY

Layer Upon Layer

Work by Terry Braunstein, Jenny Okun,
Victor Raphael, Clayton Spada, Barbara Strasen

 

November 18 - December 11, 2019
(Gallery closed November 28)


Reception: November 20 from 7 - 9 p.m.   
Artists’ talk: Tuesday, November 26 at 1 p.m.



El Camino College Art Gallery is pleased to present the work of 5 Southern California artists in Layer Upon Layer, an exhibition of works derived from the stacking of images to produce a multi-leveled view of our fluctuating, complex and increasingly rapidly moving world.
This exhibit contains work that sometimes combines digitally manipulated photographic images with hand produced drawings and details.  Each of the artists approaches the subject uniquely,

TERRY BRAUNSTEIN AND VICTOR RAPHAEL 
The collaborative artwork of Terry Braunstein and Victor Raphael grew out of their friendship and was motivated by a desire to create art in response to the political environment of the past few years. Two series are featured here: Climate Change, focusing on the world-wide crisis caused by rising global temperatures and The Wall, a series which reflects on how walls function as barriers to human connection and also inhibit those escaping persecution. Their intention in both of these series, is to make work that is universally accessible, so that the viewer can recognize the challenges we all face.

JENNY OKUN makes photographs, drawings, films and stage projections in her Los Angeles based studio.  Her art has been represented by Craig Krull Gallery in Bergamot Station, Santa Monica for over 25 years. Okun’s images in this exhibition consist of multi-layered interpretations of reality. They are photographic abstractions utilizing single subjects. Through digitally multiplying and manipulating the subject she develops a new way of seeing the subject based on her feelings and memory, creating images of transformed and idealized spaces. Compositionally Okun is interested in having the eye travel continuously and never settle. Her newest venture is the creation of elaborate, multi-image stage sets that involve highly technical projections. With these projected images she creates visual spaces that are literally physically impossible and in so being, carry the viewer into an altered and dreamlike state.

VICTOR RAPHAEL AND CLAYTON SPADA collaboratively gather images from a broad variety of  sources ranging from ancient sacred texts to astronomical photography, scientific illustration, folklore, Durer’s Expulsion to cave painting. Through meticulous pairing of these images with hand-done metal leafing by Victor Raphael, the collaborative duo have created a multi-part series of brilliant prints with pigmented ink on canvas, titled From Zero to Infinity.  The larger works displayed in this exhibition stem from the same impetus as this series but are unique paintings with hand-done elements.

“The results are complex, culturally omnivorous, and deeply layered. Below sumptuous surfaces dance the emblems, allegories, and discoveries central to human culture. Raw materials have been mined from rare original sources… Raphael and Spada do not shy away from the significant questions (nor do they dictate simple answers).”
- Douglas McCulloh

Jenny Okun; Dulce Rosa/Stage Scene 7; Digital Media; variable size
Jenny Okun; Dulce Rosa/Stage Scene 7;
Digital Media; variable size


Terry Braunstein and Victor Raphael; Erosion from Climate Change Series; pigmented print with metal leaf; 16”x 20”
Terry Braunstein and Victor Raphael; Erosion from Climate Change Series; pigmented print with metal leaf; 16”x 20”

 

Postcard Image for exhibition : Barbara Strasen; Lights & Fireworks; painted original lenticular; left and right of four changing views; 24”x24”
Postcard Image for exhibition : Barbara Strasen; Lights & Fireworks; painted original lenticular; left and right of four changing views; 24”x24”

 

BARBARA STRASEN works with painted digital images that she layers, one over another. The result is a highly complex, unpredictable meshing of images. Sometimes she incorporates the use of hand painted lenticular materials that heighten the mutability of the images, whereby the viewer sees completely different pictures, depending on the position in which he/she stands.  This physical fluctuation demonstrates the fluidity of so-called reality.  Strasen has the surprising ability to pack a huge number of disparate ingredients into a composition and still have it make a certain kind of sense.

"Strasen’s work is about the potential beauty of complexity, of crowdedness, of apparent chaos—if seen from the right vantage point or with the right attitude. It’s about Shanghai, not a still pond in the woods. It’s about swimming in the middle of a shimmering school of fish. It’s about the tornado scene in the Wizard of Oz. But a key term above is “apparent” chaos. Because it’s not really chaos at all. There’s a wonderful structure, a harmony, even a calm that underlies these storms."
-Virginia Maksymowicz and Blaise Tobia


 

 

 

Victor Raphael and Clayton Spada; Expulsion; pigmented inks with metal leaf on canvas; 25”x54”
Victor Raphael and Clayton Spada; Expulsion; pigmented inks with metal leaf on canvas; 25”x54”