El Camino College

Natural Sciences Department

                                                                                                       

Chemistry 4

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EL CAMINO COLLEGE

Natural Sciences Division

huyen

Beginning Chemistry

Chemistry 4

Section No 1184

Fall 2014

Course Information

Instructor:       HUYEN   NGUYEN

 

Phone/Fax   (310) 641-9720 

                                    E-mail  huyen126@aol.com

                                    Office hours: 5-6 pm Tuesday and Thursday

                                    Web:  http://www.elcamino.edu/faculty/hnguyen/index.html

 

Lecture          6:00-9:45    p.m.   Tuesday   Chem 101

     6:00-7:35 p.m.   Thursday     Chem 101

Pre-Lab.       9:50-10:40  p.m.    Tuesday   Chem 101

Lab.             7:40-10:50  p.m.   Thursday     Chem 164

1.         Course Description

 

Introduction to principles of chemistry, modern concepts of atomic structure and periodicity as a basic for the understanding of bonding , formulas, equations and chemical reactions.  States of matter, important elements and their compounds, solutions, acid base theories and reactions, net ionic equations, oxidation-reduction and an introduction to kinetics and chemical equilibrium.  Emphasis in lecture on chemical nomenclature and calculations.  In the laboratory, emphasis will be on observations, measurements and elementary quantitative experiments with an introduction to qualitative analysis.

 

2          Course Objectives

 

1. Utilize the language of chemistry including vocabulary, symbols, formulas, and equations.

2. Compare and contrast physical properties, physical changes, chemical properties, and chemical changes.

3. Analyze and solve quantitative problems including stoichiometry, percent yield, energy and change of temperature, gas laws, the ideal gas equation, Dalton’s law of partial pressures, percent abundance of isotopes, density, solution concentration, and colligative properties.

4. Compare and contrast ionic and covalent compounds. Evaluate bonding based on the chemical formula, and then correlate compound properties with the structure and types of bonding present.

5. Given one or the other, generate names or formulas for elements, ions, and compounds.

6. Differentiate between five reaction types: combination, decomposition, single replacement, double replacement, and complete oxidation. Given a set of reactants, diagnose the reaction type and predict the products.

7. Solve problems and express answers in scientific and decimal notation with correct units and significant figures. Use logarithms to convert among pH, pOH, [H+], and [OH-].

 

8. Correlate spontaneity of oxidation-reduction reactions with standard reduction potentials of reactants.

9. Predict the direction of equilibrium shift in equilibrium processes given a change in concentration, temperature, or volume of substances involved.

10. Create graphs from raw data and evaluate the graphs.

11. Demonstrate basic laboratory skills, including making, recording, and evaluating observations of chemical systems.

12. Evaluate volumetric laboratory glassware for the correct significant place to be read and record volumes correctly. Evaluate quantitative experimental data, and infer the presence or absence of specific ions in an unknown mixture.

 

 

3.         Student Learning Outcomes (SLO’s)

 

v Students will have the skills and knowledge necessary to succeed in General College Chemistry 

 

v       Laboratory Safety: Students will follow proper eye-protection protocol in the laboratory.

 

v  Equation Writing: Given a written equation, students will predict the products and write a properly balanced equation.

 

v    Structural Representations: Given a compound formula, students will draw an accurate Lewis structure.

 

 

 

4         Course Textbooks

 

1.1  Introductory Chemistry, 5th ed. Mark S. Cracolice, Edward I. Peters,.  Brooks/Kole- Thomson Learning  Publishers.

 

1.2       Chemistry 4 Supplement and Laboratory Manual.  Mcleod, et.,al.,  El Camino College.

 

 

5.         Attendance    

 

This course is very intensive and demanding.  Due to time constraints, not all material in the assigned chapters will be covered in class; however, you will still be held accountable for the material in the assigned chapters (unless explicitly noted otherwise). The content of most lectures requires understanding of previous material for full comprehension. Attendance is mandatory.  Excessive absences will result in a lower grade or dropping from the course. Five points will be deducted for each class absence.  If you miss five lectures and laboratory sessions you will be excluded from the class unless you provide reasonable excuse such as doctor's notice and etc.  Remember, this is a college level course; therefore much of the work is up to you.  The most successful students are the most persistent ones

 

 

 

 

6.         Calculator

 

If you do not already own a hand-held calculator, you should strongly consider buying a simple, inexpensive one. You will find it quite helpful in problem solving portions of the course. The calculator should have capabilities to perform addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, perform these operations in exponential notation, work with logarithms and raise any base to any power. Bring your calculator to class every day. If you forget your calculator, you may use another student’s calculator when they have finished the exam. You may not use programmable calculators, cell-phone calculators during a quiz or test. You are assumed to have developed calculation skills in earlier mathematics classes.  Appendix I of the textbook by  Cracolice & Peters is very helpful if you need a quick review of basic concept.

 

7.         Home work

 

            Every student is expected to study 14 hours a week (2 hours a day) outside of class to develop the skills and to acquire the knowledge necessary to succeed in this chemistry class.  You need to have a notebook for homework. Regular homework assignment is given for each chapter. Before you start your homework, review concepts in your notes first. Problems assigned are the minimum number of problems you should do.  The homework notebook will be checked on exam days. It is essential to your success that you complete the home work right away after each chapter. It is recommended that you form a study group to help each other understand basic concepts and solve problems.   Some homework will be corrected at the discussion session. 

 

 

8          Laboratory

 

Laboratory  work is required to pass the course.  Missed labs cannot be made up.  Each student will be assigned a locker for lab equipment.  Students are responsible for all lab equipment they receive at the "check-in" in September until the “check-out" in December.  The pre-lab sessions on Tuesday are for lab quiz, experiment preparation and demonstration.  The laboratory periods on Thursday are for performing experiment  in the lab ( Room Chem-164)

 

8.1       Laboratory Safety

 

In the first laboratory session, you will be trained  about the safe laboratory practices.  Once you are trained, you must sign a statement agreeing to follow the safety rules in the laboratory.  You are required to purchase a safety goggles (available at our bookstore) and wear it at all times when doing an experiment in the laboratory.  It is forbidden to take chemicals or equipment out of the laboratory.  Wearing a lab coat is not mandatory but recommended.

 

8.2       Laboratory experiment and report

 

You  must purchase the book"  Laboratory Experiments.  Chemistry 4" ( A section of Chemistry 4 Supplement ). You are required to read the instructions for each experiment carefully before coming to the lab.  At the beginning of a lab section you may be asked to describe orally the principles behind the experiment and the experiment technique.  Generally experiments are to be carried out individually.  Some experiments can be done jointly (You can team up with other person, but you need to read lab materials carefully and pay attention to every detail that is relevant to your experiment, your lab partner will be grateful).  In all cases reports are to be prepared separately and are due at the end of each laboratory period (unless otherwise announced).  The instructions for each experiment consist of five items:

 

·           Objectives:

This part should be read carefully before coming to the lab.

 

            ·           Discussion and procedure :    

This part should be read before coming to the lab and performing the experiment. 

·           Observations and equations:

This part should be written during performing the experiment.

·           Data & Calculations:

This part should be written after performing the experiment

·           Questions & Conclusion:

This part should be written after performing the experiment.

 

9.         Grading

 

The Course grade will be determined as follows:

 

            100 pts   Quizzes. (4 quizzes x 25 points)

·           400 pts   Exams (4 exams x 100 points)

·           130 pts   Laboratory experiment and report

             25 pts    Class attendance.

 25 pts    Class participation.

 20 pts    Homework & workbook checks (5 points each)

·           300 pts   Final Exam (comprehensive)

          1000 pts   Total

 

A         90-100 %

B         80-89  %

C         66-79  %

D         56-65  %

F          less than 55%

 

 

 

Student who drops the course by Friday November 14 will receive a W. After this a letter grade must be assigned.  It is your responsibility to officially drop the course.  Failure to do so could result in a grade F.  In order to drop a chemistry class, you must check out of your laboratory drawer and have a clearance card signed by a chemistry stockroom technician.

 

 

 

 

10.       ADA statement, tutoring and workshops

            Students with disabilities, who believe they need accommodations in this class are encouraged to contact the Special Resource Center (310-660-3295) on campus as soon as possible to better ensure such accommodations are implemented in a timely fashion.  As well please contact me privately to discuss your specific needs.

Tutoring is available for the Spring Semester.  Drop-in tutoring is located on the second floor of the Schauerman Library, in the Learning Center.  Tutor schedule is available on the internet at  http://www.elcamino.cc.ca.us/library

I am open to do tutoring at reasonable extra times.  If you are behind or you were ill and need help, please email me and I will attempt to help you with your being behind problem.  My email address is huyen126@aol.com

Free MESA workshops for Chem 4 are available. These are small groups of 3 to 8 students to help you with Chem 4. Facilitators are paid current chemistry students.  More information about time and location of MESA workshops will be available in class.

 

11.       Study method.

 

v  Read carefully the chapter in the textbook prior to coming to the class. This will allow you to better understand the lecture and will enhance your capability to learn new materials by yourself.

 

v  During the class pay attention to important concepts and topics that are emphasized by the instructor.  You should take note although most materials presented in class are in the handout. 

 

 

v  After class, use your lecture note, handout materials and the textbook to rewrite the materials in a compact way on flash cards.

 

v  Do assigned home-works in a notebook. Be sure that you can solve similar problems quickly as on a quiz or exam.

 

 

12.       Schedule (tentative)

 

 

Week

 

Date

 

Lecture topic

 

Experiment

 

1

 

Tuesday

August 26

 

Introduction. 

Chapter 2.  Matter and Energy

Chapter 3.  Measurement and Chemical Calculations

 

Laboratory safety.  Common laboratory equipment

 

1

 

Thursday

August 28

 

Chapter 3.  Measurement and Chemical Calculations

Laboratory safety.  Common laboratory equipment

 

2

 

Tuesday

September 2

 

Chapter 4.  Introduction to Gases

 

 

2

 

Thursday

September 4

 Chapter 4.  Introduction to Gases

 

Check in. Experiment 1: Laboratory burners.

3

 

Tuesday

September 9

 

Chapter 5. Atomic Theory:  The  Nuclear Model of the Atom

 

Demo

Experiment 2: Measurements

 

 

3

 

Thursday

September 11

 

 

Chapter 6  Chemical Nomenclature

Quiz 1 (Chapters  2-4)

 

 

Experiment 2: Measurements

 

4

 

Tuesday

September 16

Chapter 6  Chemical Nomenclature 

 

 

Demo

Experiment 7: Charles’ Law

 

4

 

Thursday

September 18

 

Chapter 6  Chemical Nomenclature

Exam 1 (Chapters  2,5)

 

 

Experiment 7: Charles’ Law

 

5

 

Tuesday

September 23

 

Chapter 7.  Chemical Formula Relationship.

 

 

Exercise A: Nomenclature

 

5

 

Thursday

September 25

Chapter 7.  Chemical Formula Relationship.

 

 

Exercise A: Nomenclature.

 

6

 

Tuesday

September 30

 

Chapter 8  Chemical Reactions

 Quiz 2 ( Chapters 6-7)

Demo

Experiment 5:  Percentage of water in an unknown hydrate salt

 

 

6

 

Thursday

October 2

 

 

Chapter 8  Chemical Reactions

 

 

Experiment 5:  Percentage of water in an unknown hydrate salt

 

 

7

 

Tuesday

October 7

Chapter 9. Chemical Change.

 

Demo: Experiment 3.  Observation of reactions in aqueous solutions

 

7

 

Thursday

October 9

 

Chapter 9. Chemical Change.

 

Experiment 3.  Observation of reactions in aqueous solutions

 

8

 

Tuesday

October 14

 

Chapter 10.  Quantity Relationship in Chemical Reactions

 

Demo: Experiment 6.  Common chemical reactions.

 

 

8

 

Thursday

October 16

 

 

Chapter 10.  Quantity Relationship in Chemical Reactions

Exam 2 ( Chapters 6-9 )

 

Experiment 6.  Common chemical reactions.

 

9

 

Tuesday

October 21

 

Chapter 11. Atomic Theory: The Quantum Model of Atom.

 

 

9

 

Thursday

October 23

Chapter 12. Chemical Bonding

Chapter 13. Structure and Shape 

Demonstration

Experiment 11: Conductivity of solution

 

10

 

Tuesday

October 28

 

Chapter 13. Structure and Shape

 

 

 

10

 

Thursday

October 30

Chapter 14.  The Ideal Gas Law and Its Applications

Exercise B.  Lewis structures and the molecular geometry

 

11

 

Tuesday

November 4

 

Chapter 14.  The Ideal Gas Law and Its Applications

Chapter 15.  Gases, Liquids, and Solids

Exam 3 ( Chapters 10-13)

Demo

 

Experiment 9 :  The Ideal Gas Law

 

11

 

Thursday

November 6

 

Chapter 16  Solution

 

 

Experiment 9 :  The Ideal Gas Law

 

12

 

Tuesday

November 11

 

 

Holiday

 

 

 

 

 

12

 

 

Thursday

November 13

 

 

Chapter 16  Solution

Quiz 3 ( chapters 14-15)

 

 

Experiment 10 :  Acid-Base Titration

 

13

 

 

Tuesday

November 18

 

 

Chapter 16  Solution

Chapter 17:  Acid Base (proton transfer) Reactions

 

 

13

Thursday

November 20

 

Chapter 17:  Acid Base (proton transfer) Reactions

Exam 4 ( chapters 14-16)

 

Experiment 10 :  Acid-Base Titration

 

14

 

Tuesday

November 25

Chapter 18 : Chemical Equilibrium

 

Exercise C: Selected Equations from experiments 3 and 6.

 

 

14

 

Thursday

November 27

 

Holiday

 

 

 

 

15

 

 

Tuesday

December 2

 

Chapter 19:  Oxidation-Reduction Reactions

 

Demo:

Experiment 12: Qualitative analysis

 

 

 

15

 

 

Thursday

December 4

 

Review

 

 

 

Experiment 12: Qualitative Analysis

 

 

16

 

 

Tuesday

December 9

 

Review

Quiz 4 ( chapters 17-19)

 

 

Check-out.

 

 

16

 

 

Thursday

December 11

 

Final Exam (comprehensive)

 

Why study Chemistry? 

Hydrogen is flammable 

MemorizationChem4 

 Chapter2 Homeworkchapter2

Chapter3 Homeworkchapter3

Chapter4 Homeworkchapter4

Chapter5 

  

More Education = More Income               

" In this economy, a higher education is the surest route to the middle class"  Obama

 Is College worth it?

Go to the following websites to think about the "opposite of loneliness" and  “sense of possibility”

http://www.yaledailynews.com/news/2012/may/27/keegan-opposite-loneliness/?cross-campus

http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/cape-car-crash-kills-yale-university-graduate-marina-keegan-article-1.1085418

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/05/31/marina-keegan-yale-studen_n_1560244.html

"Successful and unsuccessful people do not vary greatly in their abilities.  They vary in their desires to reach their potential"  John Maxwell

“However difficult life may seem, there is always something you can do and succeed at.

It matters that you don't just give up”

 -Stephen Hawking

To earn extra points for attendance, homework and class participation, you must

* Have justification for absence.

* Be active in class. 

* Not cheat and not use unauthorized electronic devices during exams.

* Come to class on time.

* Not engage in private conversation.

* Not continually leave one's seat. 

* Not leave early. 

* Follow safety rules. 

* Not read unrelated materials during lecture time.

* Be cooperative.

* Not engage in any other kind of disruptive activity. 

* Do homeworks. 

Online Resources: (list related websites as links)

PowerPoint Presentation

 

 

2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

Steve Jobs' Stanford Commencement Address 

WWW.khanacademy.org

Attitude 

Pronunciation with Merriam-Webster

Websites Using Jmol

Methane explosion in NYC

Lab-explosion

Deadly UCLA lab fire leaves haunting questions

UCLA Lab Safety

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Phone: 310-532-3760 Toll Free: 1-866-ELCAMINO (1-866-352-2646)
Last Updated: 9/10/14