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student walkingAffective Domain Activities

Affective domain activities are a set of activities to help students
build better academic habits and personal responsibility.

 

Preface


In the Spring of 2011, the Title V Graduation Initiative funded 14 math instructors and 2 human development instructors to come together and compile a set of activities to help instructors build better academic habits and personal responsibility in their students.

They are, in no particular order: Jose Villalobos, Eduardo Barajas, Martha Sandoval, Junko Forbes, Rahnavard Mohammad, Alive Martinez, Susan Taylor, Malinni Roeun, Russell Reece, Hamza Hamza, Laura Hinckley, Kaysa Laureano, Arkidy Sheynsteyn, Art Martinez, Nancylin Burruss, Amy Lacoe. I want to thank them for all their work. In the Fall of 2011, a variety of instructors tested a number of these activities in class and their recommendations were used in revising the activities. Further field testing will occur in Spring 2012.

This page holds a compilation of activities created from the above instructors or borrowed from a variety of authors. The footnote of each activity will help you find the inspiration or the source of the activity.

  1. Skip Downing, On Course: Strategies for Creating Success in College and in Life (Wadsworth , Cengage Learning, 2011)
  2. Lynn Marecek, MaryAnne Anthony-Smith, Study Skills for the College Math Student (Pearson Education, Inc, 2011)
  3. Steve Piscitelli, Choices for College Success (Pearson Education, Inc 2011)

We highly encourage you to acquire the above mentioned books to develop a deeper understanding of how valuable affective domain issues are to our students and to acquire a greater set of skills to properly incorporate them into your instruction.

 

Art Martinez

Math Dept. Basic Skills Coordinator
Title V Graduation Initiative Lead

 
 

 




Table Of Contents

Please click on either the PDF or .DOC link next to each activity to download

A)     Personal Motivation Activities: The means to direct ones energy and will towards attaining ones educational goals.

  1. ( pdf  |  doc )     Your Success is Important
  2. ( pdf  |  doc )     Believe in Yourself
  3. ( pdf  |  doc )     What is Your Motivation 
  4. ( pdf  |  doc )     Developing Self – Confidence
  5. ( pdf  |  doc )     Self Acceptance
  6. ( pdf  |  doc )     Reward Yourself   
  7. ( pdf  |  doc )     My Post Midterm Self
  8. ( pdf  |  doc )     Goals

 

B)     Personal Responsibility Activities: Taking responsibility for your actions, accepting the consequences that
come from those actions and understanding that your choices today impact your future.

  1. ( pdf  |  doc )     Accepting Personal Responsibility
  2. ( pdf  |  doc )     Making Wise Choices
  3. ( pdf  |  doc )     Translating Victim Statements
  4. ( pdf  |  doc )     Making Course Corrections 
  5. ( pdf  |  doc )     Missing The Final Exam
  6. ( pdf  |  doc )     Goals You Want to Achieve in This Class (DAPPS)
  7. ( pdf  |  doc )     My Life Plan
  8. ( pdf  |  doc )     Excuses! Excuses!   
  9. ( pdf  |  doc )     Successful Student Behavior
  10. ( pdf  |  doc )     Intervention Strategies fro Negative Thoughts                                      

                                                                                                                                                                     

C)     Academic Strategies Activities: A plan of action designed to help you achieve your educational goals.

  1. ( pdf  |  doc )     Your Study Plan
  2. ( pdf  |  doc )     The Test Analysis
  3. ( pdf  |  doc )     Mock Homework Activity
  4. ( pdf  |  doc )     Goals and Taking Control 1 
  5. ( pdf  |  doc )     Goals and Taking Control 2   
  6. ( pdf  |  doc )     Goals and Taking Control 3 
  7. ( pdf  |  doc )     Doing Homework = Test Success
  8. ( pdf  |  doc )     Cornell Study Sheets
  9. ( pdf  |  doc )     Homework Skills
  10. ( pdf  |  doc )     Math Anxiety Reduction
  11. ( pdf  |  doc )     Test Preparation Skills 

 

D)    Self – Management Activities: The methods, skills, and strategies by which you can effectively direct your
actions toward the achievement of your educational goals.

  1. ( pdf  |  doc )     The Weekly Schedule Lesson Plan
  2. ( pdf  |  doc )     The Power of Quadrant II
  3. ( pdf  |  doc )     Course Binder Lesson Plan
  4. ( pdf  |  doc )     Next Action List
  5. ( pdf  |  doc )     Successful Homework Practice
  6. ( pdf  |  doc )     Study Group 
  7. ( pdf  |  doc )     Syllabus Search
  8. Developing Self-Discipline
    ( pdf  |  doc )     32 Day Commitment (I)
    ( pdf  |  doc )     32 Day Commitment (II) 

 


 

Students fail to do well in college for a variety of reasons, and only one of them is
lack of academic preparedness. Factors such as personal autonomy, self-confidence,
ability to deal with racism, study behaviors, or social competence have as much or
more to do with grades, retention, and graduation than how well a student writes or
how competent a student is in mathematics.

            --Hunter R. Boylan, Director of the National Center for Developmental Education









 Last Published 2/20/14